Course Offerings

2018 Spring Course Offerings
University Catalog

AAS 003-10  Intro to Africana Studies (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits 13993
Professor El-Burki T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, THTR 095-10  Hip Hop II (HU) 2 credits 14113  
Students familiar with the music genres and basic dance tropes of the Hip Hop movement will explore, develop, and apply them in combinations that weave the various elements of Hip Hop culture into a high energy dance. Focus on Hip Hop dance as it influences the contemporary world view and global aesthetics. Course fee $270. 
Professor Reyes T, R; 10:45 - 12:00
 
AAS, REL, WGSS 096-10  New Black Godz (HU) CBE Diversity 4 credits 13042
New Black Godz explores a range of American icons on both sides of social promise and peril.  From celebrity self-defining agents of material abundance (Kanye West, etc.) to those mass-mediated as gods after tragically succumbing to socially-sanctioned sacrifice (Michael Brown, etc.), this course takes a cue from hip hop and black expressive cultures' rhetorical signifying on godz  - transmuting "problem status" into creative ingenuity - and explores the creative manipulation of identity and social difference in contemporary cultural production at the crossroads of social mobility and the limits of escape.  
Professor Miller T, R 1:10 - 2:25 p.m.
 
AAS, HIST 098-10  African Americans from Civil Rights to Black Lives Matter (HU) CBE Diversity 4 credits 14387
This course seeks to explore the quest of African Americans for citizenship through an examination of the rise of the Modern Civil Rights Movement to the burgeoning Black Lives Matter Movement.  Students will explore the origins of both movements, well-known and lesser-known protests and activists from the 1940s through the 2010s, and examine how these movements intersected with the contemporaneous feminist, gay rights, and anti-war movements of the last seventy years.  
Professor Duncan T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. 
 
AAS, PHIL 117-10  Race, Racism, and Philosophy (HU) CBE Diversity 4 credits 13995   
Professor Kautzer T, R; 9:20 -10:35 a.m. 
 
AAS, MUS 129-10  Jazz History II (HU) 3 credits 13722   
Professor Warfield M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, WGSS, HIST 196-10  How Black Women Made Modern America (HU) CBE Diversity  4 credits 14325
This course focuses on African American Women's sociopolitical activism in the United States from 1890 to the present. Considering the Black freedom struggle as a series of interconnected but distinct "waves," we will examine the critical role of black women in building, sustaining and leading movements across spatial and temporal boundaries in the United States.  
Professor Duncan T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, GS, HMS, HIST 197-10  Keeping Africa and Africans Healthy:  A History of Illness and Wellness (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 14329
What are myths about diseases in Africa? How does the world respond to health crises, including HIV/AIDS, Ebola and others? What are African healing traditions? What is the history of global health in Africa and its implication? This course explores various health interventions and initiatives by Africans and non-Africans—missionaries, colonial officials, NGOs etc. Students final reports/papers will “perform a post-mortem” on Africa, to critically trace and analyze how efforts to control, manage and eradicate diseases have succeeded or failed.  
Professor Essien T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. 
 
AAS, ART, GS 221-10  Global Contemporary Art (HU) CBE Global 4 credits 13625  
Professor Kart M, W; 8:45 - 10:00 a.m. 
 
AAS, ENGL 318-10  Harlem Renaissance (HU) CBE Diversity 4 credits 13634  
AAS, ENGL 318-11  3 credits 13635 (Graduate Students Only)
This course will provide students with an overview of the Harlem Renaissance.  We will explore the unparalleled explosion of African American literary, artistic and political life that took place in and around Harlem in the opening decades of the twentieth century.  We will read fiction and poetry by writers such as Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Helene Johnson, James Weldon Johnson, Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, Anne Spencer and Jean Toomer.  Although literary texts will provide the central focus of our attention, this seminar will also conduct an interdisciplinary exploration of the Renaissance as an ambitious and complex cultural phenomenon.  We will read and discuss major political writings in this period by W. E. B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells, Marcus Garvey and A. Phillip Randolph.  We will also consider developments in the visual arts (including the paintings of Aaron Douglass and Archibald Motley, the photographs of James VanDer Zee and Richard S. Roberts, and the sculpture of Augusta Savage and Sargeant Claude Johnson) and in African-American music (Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington, James P. Johnson).  This seminar will contribute to the English department’s Literature and Social Justice curriculum, focusing attention on the ways in which the literature and expressive cultures of the Harlem Renaissance contributed distinctively to the African American freedom struggle, and to feminist and socialist movements in the early twentieth century.  Students do not need prior experience in interdisciplinary methods, but they will be expected to explore the connections among varied forms of artistic and political expression.  
Professor Moglen T,R; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
AAS, GS, ANTH 324-10  Globalization and Development in Africa (SS) CBE Global (Writing Intensive) 4 credits 14089 
Professor Whitehouse T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m.
 
AAS, MLL 398-10 North African Cinema: Morocco, Algeria & Tunisia (HU) CBE Global (Writing Intensive)  4 credits 13674
This course deals with North African Cinema and more specifically with the region called the Maghreb. We will be looking at visual representations of postcolonial subjects by male and female filmmakers from the Maghreb. We will investigate how the sociopolitical context of countries such as Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia informs the constitution of subjectivity within a multicultural and multilingual community. We will look at issues such as patriarchy, nationalism, colonialism, postcolonialism, identity, migration, homosexuality, gender and Islam in North African films from Franco-Arab traditions. Course taught in English with specific requirements for Minors and Majors in French and Francophone Studies.  
Professor Berrada M, W; 2:35 – 3:50 p.m.
 

2017 Fall Course Offerings

University Catalog

AAS 003-10  Intro to Africana Studies  43508  4 credits  (SS) ART, CBE Diversity  
An interdisciplinary examination of the roots, culture, and politics of the modern black world through study of classic works in Africana Studies with emphases on the continuities among African peoples worldwide and the social forces that have shaped contemporary black life in Africa and the Americas.  Professor Kart   M, F; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 

AAS, HIST 005-10  African Civilization  44129  4 credits  (SS) CBE Global  
This course examines developments in Sub-Saharan Africa from the millennia of the ancient world to the present. Subjects include human origins, state and non-state systems, the external slave trade; colonialism, resistance to European rule; independence movements; neocolonialism.  Professor Essien   T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 
 
AAS, THTR 059-10  West African Dance  44251  2 credits  (HU)   
This course will explore the dance movement and rhythms of West Africa. Students will learn African- based dance techniques and characteristics, as well as the fundamental connection between the drums and the dance. Although some videos will be viewed, this is primarily a studio course; students should come prepared to move.  Professor Carlson   T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. 
 
AAS, THTR 066  Hip Hop Dance  2 credits  (HU) CBE Diversity  
This course teaches the techniques, vocabulary, and the history behind the various elements of the Hip Hop Movement. Instruction also focuses upon the cultural influence of Hip Hop dance styles, and the overall social influence of the Hip Hop Movement.  
Section 010 CRN 44248 Professor Reyes   T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
Section 011 CRN 44249 Professor Reyes   T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m.
 
AAS, ART, GS 125-10  Art and Architecture of Africa from Colonial to Contemporary Times  43909  4 credits  (HU) CBE Global  
This course is structured around case studies of art and architecture from early traditions up through the present. The focus is on cultural production, religious art and architecture (local as well as Christian and Muslim traditions), craftsmanship, style, materials, trade, and international exhibition of art objects in Museums. The literature draws from art historical, anthropological, and historical analyses as well as museum studies. Students should be prepared to attend Museums/galleries during the semester.  Professor Kart   M, F; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, MUS 128-10  Jazz History I  42968  3 credits  (HU)   
This course is a study of the roots of jazz. Starting in West Africa, the course traces the synthesis of African and European elements to 1945. Musicians covered are Gottshalk, Bolden, Morton, Armstrong, Hawkins, Basie, Ellington, and others.  Professor Warfield   M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, HIST 130-10  African American History  44127  4 credits  (SS) CBE Diversity  
This course examines Blacks in America from the first importation of Africans to the implementation of civil rights laws. Subjects include: West African origins, slave trade, slavery, free blacks and emancipation and study of Reconstruction, segregation, urbanization, and the struggle for racial equality.  Professor Duncan  T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, THTR 132-10  Hip Hop Theatre  44243  4 credits  (HU)   
This course is an introduction to the creation and performance of Hip Hop Theatre. Exploration of the history and culture of Hip Hop through original written material, live performance, music, film, video and web based content. Public Performances. Prerequisite: Audition. Consent given by instructor. Instructor permission required. Professor Johnson, K   M, W; 2:10 - 4:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, GS, HMS, HIST 197-10 Keeping Africa and Africans Healthy: A History of Illness & Wellness  44146  4 credits  (HU)   
What are the myths about diseases in Africa? How does the world respond to health crises, including HIV/AIDS, Ebola and others? What are African healing traditions? What is the history of global health in Africa and its implications? This course explores various health interventions and initiatives by Africans and non-Africans—missionaries, colonial officials, NGOs etc. Students final reports/papers will “perform a post-mortem” on Africa, to critically trace and analyze how efforts to control, manage and eradicate diseases have succeeded or failed.  Professor Essien   T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. 
 
AAS, POLS 230-10  Social Movements and Legacies of the 1960s  43965  4 credits  (SS) CBE Diversity  
The lessons and legacies of 1960s social and political movements. Students examine civil rights, black power movements, the New Left, campus protests, the Vietnam war and antiwar movement, the counterculture, women's ecology movements and assess their connection to democracy, today's world and their own lives.  Professor DiMaggio   T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 
 
AAS, SOC 313-10  Social Movements  43945  4 credits  (SS)   
Explores the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements through both sociological theory and empirical case studies. Covers questions of what constitutes a social movement, where and when social movements arise, who joins a social movement, and how social movements are able to contribute to change. Answers to these questions highlight issues of social movement recruitment and leadership, interactions between movements and the media, the state, and the broader public, ideology, strategies and tactics, and the factors contributing to the success and failure of social movements. Course readings are drawn from case studies on civil rights, women's rights, gay rights, the environment, American Indians, abortion, globalization, antiapartheid, democratization, peace, and Islamic fundamentalism.  Professor Munson   M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
AAS, ENGL 318-010  Contemporary Black Poetics  43195  4 credits  (HU) CBE Diversity  
This course examines various modes of Black American poetic production in the 21st century, including: “traditional” written poetry, spoken word poetry and rap music.  Critical approaches to the Black poetic tradition are informed by theories developed by Evie Shockley in Renegade Poetics, Michelle Wright in Physics of Blackness, and other scholars/thinkers engaging these poetic forms. Shockley poses a question central to this course: “what evidence is there in the text, if any, of the African American writer’s wrangling with competing expectations or desires for whether and how race will function in her work?”  This course seeks to critically engage this question through the work of a wide range of poets, including: Harryette Mullen, Elizabeth Alexander, Tim Seibles, Shara McCallum, Kendrick Lamar and many others. Graduate students will be expected to present throughout the term and will have to research and write a professional conference paper on Black poetics.  Professor Peterson   M, 4:10 - 7:00 p.m. 
 
AAS 371-14  Independent Study    1-3 credits    
Independent study in advanced areas of Africana Studies. Independent research with an individual faculty member in the Africana Studies program. Instructor permission required. 
Section 010 CRN 42266 Professor Peterson   Section 012 CRN 42646 Professor Kart     Section 015 CRN 43158 Professor Duncan        
Section 011 CRN 42645 Professor Miller Section 013 CRN 42647 Professor Essien     Section 014 CRN 42648 Professor Staff  
 
AAS 372-10  Independent Study  42267  2-3 credits  
Independent study in advanced areas of Africana Studies. Independent research with an individual faculty member in the Africana Studies program.  Instructor permission required. 
Section 010 CRN 42267 Professor Peterson Section 012 CRN 42650 Professor Kart       Section 014 CRN 42652 Professor Staff    
Section 011 CRN 42649 Professor Miller Section 013 CRN 42651 Professor Essien   Section 015 CRN 43167 Professor Duncan    
 
2017 Summer Course Offerings

AAS, SOC 163-10  Sociology of Hip Hop Culture (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits CRN 21238
Hip Hop culture is a complex form of artistic practices reflecting and impacting the environments in which they were produced. Through readings, music and video, this class will uncover the origins of Hip Hop by examining the musical history of the Afro-diaspora in the 20th century. Further study will reveal how the young Bronx, NY underclass in the 1970s fused elements of past musical styles with their own personal and political expression that sparked a worldwide phenomenon and culture industry.  Professor McIntosh (SS 2) M, W 7:00 - 9:50 p.m .
 
AAS, SOC 163-11  Sociology of Hip Hop Culture (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits CRN 21239
Hip Hop culture is a complex form of artistic practices reflecting and impacting the environments in which they were produced. Through readings, music and video, this class will uncover the origins of Hip Hop by examining the musical history of the Afro-diaspora in the 20th century. Further study will reveal how the young Bronx, NY underclass in the 1970s fused elements of past musical styles with their own personal and political expression that sparked a worldwide phenomenon and culture industry.  Professor McIntosh (SS 1) M, W 7:00 - 9:50 p.m .
 
AAS, GS, WGSS, HIST 195-10  Women, Gender, Sexuality and Race in African Societies (HU) CBE Diversity  4 credits CRN 20992
This course explore the various ways in which womanhood, gender, sexuality and race are defined, constructed and articulated in African societies. The course is interdisciplinary, drawing from historical writings, novels, biography, anthropology, political science, health and others to examine diverse activities and contributions of African women from the pre-colonial period.  Professor Essien (SS 2) online
 
**CANCELED** AAS, WGSS, ENGL 196-11  Love in the Time of Tinder: Relationships, Identity and Technology (HU) CBE Diversity  4 credits CRN 21225
In this 100-level course, we will explore how people use various kinds of digital, electronic, and social technologies to engage in relationships with one another, and with the technology. Through a series of readings and films, students will:
·       Analyze the role of technology in personal relationships, and consider larger social and global issues concerning the production, use, and reliance upon technologies.
·       Consider the gendered and racial components that affect how individuals interact with technologies.
·       Speculate why writers and film-makers are preoccupied with futuristic technologies in science fiction and speculative fiction. What do these preoccupations reveal about our current historical moment and fears?  How will technologies continue to impact the way we communicate and bond with one another in the future? Professor Sarah Heidebrink-Bruno (SS 2) online
 
AAS, GS, HMS 197-10  Globalization and Health in Ghana (SS)   3 credits CRN 21431 (Study Abroad) 
This 4-week field-based course fosters global engagement by introducing students to the historical, social, cultural, and political processes that are at the forefront of globalization and health in Ghana. One objective of the program is to offer students who may not have opportunities to travel abroad (first-generation college students) access to, as well as support and preparation for overseas travel and education. Students will learn through cultural immersion, including tours, university campus visits, and first-hand experience and interactions with health service providers in Accra, Ghana’s capital city and nearby towns and villages. Students can choose from the following for their individual and group research projects: 1) focus entirely on globalization, 2) focus entirely on health, or 3) explore the relationship between globalization and health, and the processes that link them. Globalization will be explored in the context of cultural dynamics and the political economy. The role and impact of factors such as identity, trade, neoliberalism, arts, technology, Pentecostal Christianity, NGOs and the state, will be examined. Dimensions of health include conceptions of illness and healing, health systems and services, and social determinants of health such as gender, education, environment, religion, cultural norms, values and resources. Students interested in exploring specific global health issues such as maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, mental health, drug abuse etc. are welcome.  Professors Whitehouse, Alang and Essien 
 
**CANCELLED** AAS, ART, GS 221-10  Global Contemporary Art (HU) CBE Global, WI (Writing Intensive)  4 credits CRN 20901
The course examines artworks from around the world c. 1980s to the present. Topics include revolutionary arts, globalism, EcoArt, postcolonial arts, phenomenological, experiential and new media arts. Global feminist projects, design/build production, graffiti and popular arts are covered regularly. International Art Biennials, exhibitions and the built environment are featured. Art Theory is explored through iconographic, formal and contextual (political, social, financial) analysis. Movements are situated in historical frameworks as well as in their international scope and value.  Professor Kart (SS 1) T, R 9:00 – 11:50 a.m.
 
AAS, COMM 297-10  Race, Sports, Media and Social Activism (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits CRN 21378
From Jackie Robinson to Muhammed Ali, Kareem Abdul-Jabaar and Colin Kaepernick, American athletes of color have utilized their social capital and media presence to take stands against injustice. Successfully engaging in public protest as an athlete requires an understanding of the power of media; the social, cultural and political landscape; and a willingness to exploit/capitalize one’s own celebrity status.  In this course we will investigate the role and use of media in key efforts of social resistance among American athletes of color. Our analysis will include a look at the lives of  athletes who engage in these actions; key acts of resistance; media coverage; and the public response both for and against the protests. Students will learn about media literacy, the power of representation, public sphere protest among celebrities, the role of news media in protest, and the shifts in resistance efforts as a result of new media technology.  Professor El-Burki
(SS 1) M, W; 10:00 - 12:50 p.m.