Course Offerings

2017 Fall Course Offerings
University Catalog

AAS 003-10  Intro to Africana Studies  43508  4 credits  (SS) ART, CBE Diversity  
An interdisciplinary examination of the roots, culture, and politics of the modern black world through study of classic works in Africana Studies with emphases on the continuities among African peoples worldwide and the social forces that have shaped contemporary black life in Africa and the Americas.  Professor Kart   M, F; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 

AAS, HIST 005-10  African Civilization  44129  4 credits  (SS) CBE Global  
This course examines developments in Sub-Saharan Africa from the millennia of the ancient world to the present. Subjects include human origins, state and non-state systems, the external slave trade; colonialism, resistance to European rule; independence movements; neocolonialism.  Professor Essien   T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 
 
AAS, THTR 059-10  West African Dance  44251  2 credits  (HU)   
This course will explore the dance movement and rhythms of West Africa. Students will learn African- based dance techniques and characteristics, as well as the fundamental connection between the drums and the dance. Although some videos will be viewed, this is primarily a studio course; students should come prepared to move.  Professor Carlson   T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. 
 
AAS, THTR 066  Hip Hop Dance  2 credits  (HU) CBE Diversity  
This course teaches the techniques, vocabulary, and the history behind the various elements of the Hip Hop Movement. Instruction also focuses upon the cultural influence of Hip Hop dance styles, and the overall social influence of the Hip Hop Movement.  
Section 010 CRN 44248 Professor Reyes   T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
Section 011 CRN 44249 Professor Reyes   T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m.
 
AAS, ART, GS 125-10  Art and Architecture of Africa from Colonial to Contemporary Times  43909  4 credits  (HU) CBE Global  
This course is structured around case studies of art and architecture from early traditions up through the present. The focus is on cultural production, religious art and architecture (local as well as Christian and Muslim traditions), craftsmanship, style, materials, trade, and international exhibition of art objects in Museums. The literature draws from art historical, anthropological, and historical analyses as well as museum studies. Students should be prepared to attend Museums/galleries during the semester.  Professor Kart   M, F; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, MUS 128-10  Jazz History I  42968  3 credits  (HU)   
This course is a study of the roots of jazz. Starting in West Africa, the course traces the synthesis of African and European elements to 1945. Musicians covered are Gottshalk, Bolden, Morton, Armstrong, Hawkins, Basie, Ellington, and others.  Professor Warfield   M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, HIST 130-10  African American History  44127  4 credits  (SS) CBE Diversity  
This course examines Blacks in America from the first importation of Africans to the implementation of civil rights laws. Subjects include: West African origins, slave trade, slavery, free blacks and emancipation and study of Reconstruction, segregation, urbanization, and the struggle for racial equality.  Professor Duncan  T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, THTR 132-10  Hip Hop Theatre  44243  4 credits  (HU)   
This course is an introduction to the creation and performance of Hip Hop Theatre. Exploration of the history and culture of Hip Hop through original written material, live performance, music, film, video and web based content. Public Performances. Prerequisite: Audition. Consent given by instructor. Instructor permission required. Professor Johnson, K   M, W; 2:10 - 4:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, GS, HMS, HIST 197-10  Keeping Africa and Africans Healthy: From Missionaries, Explorers, and Colonial Official to NGOs  44146  4 credits  (HU)   
What are the myths about diseases in Africa? How does the world respond to health crises, including HIV/AIDS, Ebola and others? What are African healing traditions? What is the history of global health in Africa and its implications? This course explores various health interventions and initiatives by Africans and non-Africans—missionaries, colonial officials, NGOs etc. Students final reports/papers will “perform a post-mortem” on Africa, to critically trace and analyze how efforts to control, manage and eradicate diseases have succeeded or failed.  Professor Essien   T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. 
 
AAS, POLS 230-10  Social Movements and Legacies of the 1960s  43965  4 credits  (SS) CBE Diversity  
The lessons and legacies of 1960s social and political movements. Students examine civil rights, black power movements, the New Left, campus protests, the Vietnam war and antiwar movement, the counterculture, women's ecology movements and assess their connection to democracy, today's world and their own lives.  Professor DiMaggio   T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 
 
AAS, SOC 313-10  Social Movements  43945  4 credits  (SS)   
Explores the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements through both sociological theory and empirical case studies. Covers questions of what constitutes a social movement, where and when social movements arise, who joins a social movement, and how social movements are able to contribute to change. Answers to these questions highlight issues of social movement recruitment and leadership, interactions between movements and the media, the state, and the broader public, ideology, strategies and tactics, and the factors contributing to the success and failure of social movements. Course readings are drawn from case studies on civil rights, women's rights, gay rights, the environment, American Indians, abortion, globalization, antiapartheid, democratization, peace, and Islamic fundamentalism.  Professor Munson   M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
AAS, ENGL 318-010  Contemporary Black Poetics  43195  4 credits  (HU) CBE Diversity  
This course examines various modes of Black American poetic production in the 21st century, including: “traditional” written poetry, spoken word poetry and rap music.  Critical approaches to the Black poetic tradition are informed by theories developed by Evie Shockley in Renegade Poetics, Michelle Wright in Physics of Blackness, and other scholars/thinkers engaging these poetic forms. Shockley poses a question central to this course: “what evidence is there in the text, if any, of the African American writer’s wrangling with competing expectations or desires for whether and how race will function in her work?”  This course seeks to critically engage this question through the work of a wide range of poets, including: Harryette Mullen, Elizabeth Alexander, Tim Seibles, Shara McCallum, Kendrick Lamar and many others. Graduate students will be expected to present throughout the term and will have to research and write a professional conference paper on Black poetics.  Professor Peterson   M, 4:10 - 7:00 p.m. 
 
AAS 371-14  Independent Study    1-3 credits    
Independent study in advanced areas of Africana Studies. Independent research with an individual faculty member in the Africana Studies program. Instructor permission required. 
Section 010 CRN 42266 Professor Peterson   Section 012 CRN 42646 Professor Kart     Section 015 CRN 43158 Professor Duncan        
Section 011 CRN 42645 Professor Miller Section 013 CRN 42647 Professor Essien     Section 014 CRN 42648 Professor Staff  
 
AAS 372-10  Independent Study  42267  2-3 credits  
Independent study in advanced areas of Africana Studies. Independent research with an individual faculty member in the Africana Studies program.  Instructor permission required. 
Section 010 CRN 42267 Professor Peterson Section 012 CRN 42650 Professor Kart       Section 014 CRN 42652 Professor Staff    
Section 011 CRN 42649 Professor Miller Section 013 CRN 42651 Professor Essien   Section 015 CRN 43167 Professor Duncan    
 
2017 Summer Course Offerings

AAS, SOC 163-10  Sociology of Hip Hop Culture (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits CRN 21238
Hip Hop culture is a complex form of artistic practices reflecting and impacting the environments in which they were produced. Through readings, music and video, this class will uncover the origins of Hip Hop by examining the musical history of the Afro-diaspora in the 20th century. Further study will reveal how the young Bronx, NY underclass in the 1970s fused elements of past musical styles with their own personal and political expression that sparked a worldwide phenomenon and culture industry.  Professor McIntosh (SS 2) M, W 7:00 - 9:50 p.m .
 
AAS, SOC 163-11  Sociology of Hip Hop Culture (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits CRN 21239
Hip Hop culture is a complex form of artistic practices reflecting and impacting the environments in which they were produced. Through readings, music and video, this class will uncover the origins of Hip Hop by examining the musical history of the Afro-diaspora in the 20th century. Further study will reveal how the young Bronx, NY underclass in the 1970s fused elements of past musical styles with their own personal and political expression that sparked a worldwide phenomenon and culture industry.  Professor McIntosh (SS 1) M, W 7:00 - 9:50 p.m .
 
AAS, GS, WGSS, HIST 195-10  Women, Gender, Sexuality and Race in African Societies (HU) CBE Diversity  4 credits CRN 20992
This course explore the various ways in which womanhood, gender, sexuality and race are defined, constructed and articulated in African societies. The course is interdisciplinary, drawing from historical writings, novels, biography, anthropology, political science, health and others to examine diverse activities and contributions of African women from the pre-colonial period.  Professor Essien (SS 2) online
 
AAS, WGSS, ENGL 196-11  Love in the Time of Tinder: Relationships, Identity and Technology (HU) CBE Diversity  4 credits CRN 21225
In this 100-level course, we will explore how people use various kinds of digital, electronic, and social technologies to engage in relationships with one another, and with the technology. Through a series of readings and films, students will:
·       Analyze the role of technology in personal relationships, and consider larger social and global issues concerning the production, use, and reliance upon technologies.
·       Consider the gendered and racial components that affect how individuals interact with technologies.
·       Speculate why writers and film-makers are preoccupied with futuristic technologies in science fiction and speculative fiction. What do these preoccupations reveal about our current historical moment and fears?  How will technologies continue to impact the way we communicate and bond with one another in the future? Professor Sarah Heidebrink-Bruno (SS 2) online
 
AAS, GS, HMS 197-10  Globalization and Health in Ghana (SS)   3 credits CRN 21431 (Study Abroad) 
This 4-week field-based course fosters global engagement by introducing students to the historical, social, cultural, and political processes that are at the forefront of globalization and health in Ghana. One objective of the program is to offer students who may not have opportunities to travel abroad (first-generation college students) access to, as well as support and preparation for overseas travel and education. Students will learn through cultural immersion, including tours, university campus visits, and first-hand experience and interactions with health service providers in Accra, Ghana’s capital city and nearby towns and villages. Students can choose from the following for their individual and group research projects: 1) focus entirely on globalization, 2) focus entirely on health, or 3) explore the relationship between globalization and health, and the processes that link them. Globalization will be explored in the context of cultural dynamics and the political economy. The role and impact of factors such as identity, trade, neoliberalism, arts, technology, Pentecostal Christianity, NGOs and the state, will be examined. Dimensions of health include conceptions of illness and healing, health systems and services, and social determinants of health such as gender, education, environment, religion, cultural norms, values and resources. Students interested in exploring specific global health issues such as maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, mental health, drug abuse etc. are welcome.  Professors Whitehouse, Alang and Essien 
 
AAS, ART, GS 221-10  Global Contemporary Art (HU) CBE Global, WI (Writing Intensive)  4 credits CRN 20901
The course examines artworks from around the world c. 1980s to the present. Topics include revolutionary arts, globalism, EcoArt, postcolonial arts, phenomenological, experiential and new media arts. Global feminist projects, design/build production, graffiti and popular arts are covered regularly. International Art Biennials, exhibitions and the built environment are featured. Art Theory is explored through iconographic, formal and contextual (political, social, financial) analysis. Movements are situated in historical frameworks as well as in their international scope and value.  Professor Kart (SS 1) T, R 9:00 – 11:50 a.m.
 
AAS, COMM 297-10  Race, Sports, Media and Social Activism (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits CRN 21378
From Jackie Robinson to Muhammed Ali, Kareem Abdul-Jabaar and Colin Kaepernick, American athletes of color have utilized their social capital and media presence to take stands against injustice. Successfully engaging in public protest as an athlete requires an understanding of the power of media; the social, cultural and political landscape; and a willingness to exploit/capitalize one’s own celebrity status.  In this course we will investigate the role and use of media in key efforts of social resistance among American athletes of color. Our analysis will include a look at the lives of  athletes who engage in these actions; key acts of resistance; media coverage; and the public response both for and against the protests. Students will learn about media literacy, the power of representation, public sphere protest among celebrities, the role of news media in protest, and the shifts in resistance efforts as a result of new media technology.  Professor El-Burki
(SS 1) M, W; 10:00 - 12:50 p.m.


2017 Spring Course Offerings

University Catalog

AAS, THTR 066-010  Hip Hop Dance  CRN 14305  2 credits (HU) CBE Diversity   
Techniques, vocabulary, and history behind the various elements of the Hip Hop Movement. Focus upon the cultural influence of Hip Hop dance styles, and the overall social influence of the Hip Hop Movement.  Professor Reyes   M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, HIST 096-010  Mass Incarceration in the United States  CRN 13423  4 credits (SS)   
The United States has the world’s highest prison population. This course critically examines the impacts of mass incarceration on U.S. society. We start the semester with an overview of the history of prisons in the U.S., from the colonial period to the present. After exploring this long history, we focus on the period of 1970s-present to analyze the political, economic, legal and cultural factors that facilitate mass incarceration, and to understand methods people have used to challenge the prison system.  Professor Kanosky  M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, LAS, SOC 106-010  Race and Ethnicity in the Americas  CRN 14207  4 credits (SS) CBE Global    
How is it possible that someone who is officially considered black in the United States, can embody different racial identities throughout current Latin America? Even more, how is it possible that people consider white nowadays were not officially so in early twentieth-century US (although they were viewed as white in the Latin American context at the same time period)? This course offers a historical comparative analysis of the nature and dynamics of race between the United States and Latin America.  Professor Ceron-Anaya  M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
AAS, ENGL 121-010  African Diaspora Literature  CRN 14087  4 credits (HU)   
This is a survey course that will provide students with a close look at the body of work by African American, AfroLatino/Latin American, and African authors. It will explore topics in critical race and diaspora theory, gender, and sexuality through novels, poetry, and visual culture. Some authors whose work we will engage with include: Toni Morrison, Loida Maritza Perez, Audre Lorde, and James Baldwin among others.  
Professor Zamora  T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 
 
AAS, ART, GS 124-010  Arts of the Black World 16th - 20th Centuries  CRN 14153  4 credits (HU)   
This course is an introduction to the artistic practices originating in Africa that subsequently influenced countless world cultures. Forced and voluntary migrations of populations out of their African homelands led to their adoption of new artistic and aesthetic styles, while their host cultures were frequently deeply changed by the arrival of African aesthetics. The course will touch upon arts of the enslaved populations in the AnteBellum South, early African American painting through the Harlem Renaissance, the religious arts of Haiti (Vodou) and Cuba (Santería), and contemporary production from Black Brazilian, American and European artists. Contemporary topics will rotate based on current events. Students should be prepared to attend Museum visits during the semester.  Professor Kart  M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. 
 
AAS, MUS 129-010  Jazz History II  CRN 14256  3 credits (HU)   
A survey of modern jazz from 1945 to present. Musicians covered include Parker, Gillespie, Monk, Davis, Coltrane, Hancock, and Coleman. Can be taken independently of Jazz History I, but the first course would be helpful.  Professor Warfield M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 
 
AAS, THTR 132-010  Hip Hop Theatre  CRN 12674  4 credits (HU)   
Introduction to the creation and performance of Hip Hop Theatre. Exploration of the history and culture of Hip Hop through original written material, live performance, music, film, video and web based content. Public Performances. Prerequisite: Audition. Instructor permission required.  
Professor Johnson  T, R; 2:10 - 4:00 p.m. 
 
THTR 185-011  Hip Hop Theatre Advanced Project  CRN 14284  1-4 credits (HU) AAS  
Department permission required. Professor Johnson
 
AAS, GS 196-010 Global Initiatives and Africa Engagement  CRN 12545  4 credits (SS)
This is an interdisciplinary course designed for students to apply experiences acquired through a variety of educational opportunities, including: service learning, research and/or professional internships, study abroad, community engagement, and the wide range of global perspectives acquired through multidisciplinary learning/education at Lehigh. The course focuses on developing strategic/policy initiatives to engage social, political, and cultural situations in Africa. Students will take comparative approaches and deploy comprehensive analytics, building on various indigenous/knowledge structures, to critically explore pertinent solutions to some of the continent’s most enduring challenges, especially: energy, environment and sustainable systems management.  Professor Dzidzor Essien  M, W 2:35 – 3:50 p.m.  
 
AAS, ART, GS 221-010  Global Contemporary: Recent Movements Around the World  CRN 14145  4 credits (HU) CBE Global 
A focus on contemporary artworks from around the world and artists that produce them. Topics are based on movements emerging in the last 40 years, including: Revolutionary arts, Globalism, EcoArt, Postcolonial arts, phenomenological, experiential and new media arts. Global feminist projects, design/build production, graffiti and popular arts will be covered regularly. International Art Biennials are explored as vectors for international artistic exchange and dissemination.  Art Theory will be explored through iconographic, formal and contextual (political, social, financial) analyses. 
Professor Kart   M, W; 8:45 - 10:00 a.m. 
 
AAS, COMM 276-010  Media and Race  CRN 13327 4 credits (SS)  
Examines the representation of various races and ethnicities in news media as well as the impact of such portrayals upon public opinion, public policy and interpersonal life. Considers the role of print, broadcast focuses on making connections between information and entertainment media that perpetuate stereotypes and dominant understandings of various groups. Open only to declared COMM or AAS major/minor, all others need department permission.  Professor El-Burki   M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, POLS, WGSS 295-010  Revolution on Campus? Protest politics and the university  CRN 14175 4 credits   
What leads to campus activism?  When is it successful?  When does it spread beyond a single location?  This course examines campus activism both in the USA and around the world to try and answer some of these questions. We will consider how Lehigh can be a space of meaningful activism. The course uses social movement theorizing to make sense of student politics.  Professor Deo R; 1:10 - 4:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, ENGL 318-011  Contemporary Black Liberation Narratives in Literature and Film  CRN 14157  4 credits (HU) CBE Diversity 
This course examines contemporary narratives of Black liberation across multiple genres, including literature, graphic novels, film/television and music. At the intersections of African American history, the transatlantic slave trade, emergent literary genres and new media, the experiences of African Americans continue to be realized in innovative cultural contexts. Students will be required to view films and television programs in addition to the readings required for the course. Class meets once per week and students will be required to attend weekly screening sessions in addition to regular class meetings.  Course texts include: Kyle Baker’s Nat Turner (graphic novel), Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad, Octavia Butler’s Kindred (the Graphic Novel), Ishmael Reed’s Flight to Canada, The Roots miniseries, WGN’s Underground (TV) and other texts and films related to the course subject.  
Professor Peterson   T, 1:10 - 4:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, ENGL 318-013  Family, Place, Class, and Race in Contemporary American Literature  CRN 14159   4 credits (HU, SS) CBE Diversity  
Four major American authors write about contemporary American identity-- T.C. Boyle, The Tortilla Curtain; Russell Banks, Continental Drift; Jane Smiley, Some Luck; and Nathan Hill, The Nix—and explore the overlapping issues of family, place, class, and race.  Professor Fifer M, W, F; 10:10 - 11:00 a.m. 
 
AAS 371 Independent Study  Multiple sections, CRN varies by instructor  1-3 credits (ND)   
 
AAS 372 Independent Study  Multiple sections,  CRN varies by instructor  2-3 credits   
 
AAS, COMM, WGSS 376-010  New Media, Race and Gender  CRN 13330  4 credits (SS)  
This class will take an exploratory approach to understanding the relationship between race, gender and new media. To this end, it will examine depictions of racial minorities and women online; how users access and use new media across race and gender (including a look at the digital divide); and differences in use of social media websites across race and gender. The goal of this course is for students to understand the ways in which existing racial and gender categorizations are/are not transmitted to the online community and do/do not become an extension of present social hierarchy. Open only to Africana Studies, Journalism and WGSS majors/minors.  Alll others require instructor permission.  Professor El-Burki   T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 
 
AAS 390-010  Honors Thesis  CRN 13993  1-4 credits   
 
AAS, WGSS, ENGL 396-010  Race and Gender in 18th Century British Literature  CRN 14066  4 credits (HU)  Writing Intensive (WI)
The Rights of Man, Thomas Paine’s classic argument in defense of the individual’s right to assert freedom in the face of tyranny, was a popular late-eighteenth century refrain originating from the 1789 French Revolution. But generalized arguments about individual human rights also gave rise to specific debates concerning the rights of women and Negro slaves. What rights were these individuals denied in eighteenth-century Britain and how did the period’s literature reflect their dilemmas? This course will consider these questions as a way of introducing you to the study of race and gender in a British colonial context. But it is particularly concerned with occasions in literature where British writers combined simultaneous discourses about race and gender in ways that sometimes helped and at other times hindered the fights against tyranny that Negro slaves and female advocates fought. We will read plays, poetry, novels, short stories, travel literature, and non-fiction prose as well as recent theories about gender and racial construction in the eighteenth century to discuss representations of British men and women, and colonial Others like Africans, Negro slaves, Creoles and Jews. We will consider an assortment of issues ranging from slavery, anti-slavery, abolition, miscegenation, mimicry, ambivalence, hybridity, anti-Semitism, blackness and whiteness, to marriage, libertinism, and sexual double standards in a variety of canonical and obscure texts. Department Permission Required 
Professor Dominique  T, R;  1:10 - 2:25 p.m. 
 
AAS, LAS, ENGL 397-010  Poetics of Blackness in Black and Latino Lit and Performance  CRN 14109 4 credits (HU)  CBE Diversity  
This is an interdisciplinary course that explores the representation and discourse of blackness in Black and Latino cultural production. Specifically the course will explore how black experiences are represented, embodied, performed, and theorized. Some authors/artists that we will analyze include: Junot Díaz, Cardi B, Beyonce, and Gloria Anzald ua among others. As part of the course students will write creatively and academically as well as be in live conversation with spoken-word poets and playwrights.  Professor Zamora  T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. 

AAS, HIST 397‐011 Follow the Drum Pan: The Making of the 20th Century African Diaspora CRN 14268 4 credits (HU) CBE Global
This course offers students a comparative study in the makings and meanings of diaspora. We begin by defining the differences and similarities between diaspora and related concepts such as race, nation and cultural identity. Focusing specifically on the making of the Black Atlantic world, we then draw a comparative analysis between Black Diasporic life and that of other global dispersals, particularly among Asian and indigenous populations. Resistance serves as a key link in this comparative study. As such, we focus on themes such as slavery and colonialism, black revolt in the modern world, Third World/Afro‐Asian liberation, Black/Third World Feminism, globalization, the sexual politics of diaspora. Across each of these themes, we work under the premise that diaspora is an open and fluid space through which its participants “make our world anew.” Professor Duncan T, R; 1:10 ‐2:25 p.m.
 
AAS, WGSS 398-010  Readings:  African American Women  CRN 14203  4 credits (HU) CBE Diversity  
This course will explore the cultural, economic and political history of African American women in the United States from slavery to the present. Through a combination of books, primary sources, and film we will explore how African American women have addressed what is often referred to as the “double burden” of sexism and racism while seeking to define their own identities as individuals, wives, mothers, workers, and citizens.  Major themes will include labor, family, social movements, and civil rights.  Professor Duncan   R; 4:10 - 7:00 p.m. 
 
AAS, HMS, GS, SOC 398-011  Infections and Inequalities: HIV, TB, & Malaria in the Global South  CRN 14335  4 credits  
This course will explore the social, economic, and environmental causes of HIV, TB, and malaria in developing nations, with a particular focus on the characteristics and causes of these diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa. Students will engage theories and perspectives on development, globalization, and social inequality to explain trends in HIV, TB, and malaria and to understand why certain groups are more vulnerable to infection than others. The course will have a strong project or research-based component, where students will be asked to create an innovative research paper, website, interactive timeline, intervention plan, project proposal, or other deliverable.  Open only to AAS, HMS, SOC and GS juniors and seniors.  Professor Austin   W; 1:10 - 4:00 p.m. 
 

2016 Fall Course Offerings

AAS 003-10  Introduction to Africana Studies CRN 44068 (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits 
An interdisciplinary examination of the roots, culture, and politics of the modern black world through the study of classic works in Africana Studies with emphasis on the continuities among African peoples worldwide and the social forces that have shaped contemporary black life in Africa and the Americas.  
Professor Essien T, R; 1:10 - 2:35 p.m.
 
THTR 056-10 Jazz Dance  CRN 44209 (HU) 2 credits ($270 course fee applies)
Jazz dance styles and combinations.
 Professor Patterson  T, R; 1:10 - 2:35 p.m.
 
**CANCELLED** AAS, THTR 062-10  Black Theatre CRN 42723 (HU)   4 credits 
Introduction to the creation and performance of Black Theatre. This course will investigate the development of a vital black dramatic tradition in America. Through deep engagement of  plays, playwrights and performers from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary present, students will not only gain a deeper understanding of the evolution of  African Diaspora and African American Theatre Histories and performances, this interdisciplinary exploration of black music, film, theatre, art, dance and live performance will also culminate into a creative final Black Theatre project.  
Professor Williams M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m.
 
AAS, THTR  095-10  Hip Hop Dance CRN 43703 (HU) CBE Diversity  2 credits ($270 course fee applies)
Students will develop and learn the techniques, vocabulary, and the history behind the genres of HipHop movement and cultural influence of the dance styles and it's influence of society through, HipHop movement.  
Professor Reyes T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
 
AAS, THTR  096-10  West African Dance CRN 44166 (HU)   2 credits ($270 course fee applies)
This course will explore the dance movement and rhythms of West Africa. Students will learn African- based dance technique, characteristics, and the fundamental connection between the drums and the dance. Although some videos will be viewed, this is primarily a studio course; students should come prepared to move.  
Professor Carlson T,R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m.
 
AAS, REL, ENGL, JST 102-10  Promised Lands: Jewish and African American Children's Literature CRN 44063 (HU)   4 credits 
In the Hebrew Bible, Psalm 137 asks, “How can we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land?” For Jews, blacks, and black Jews, this was and is a poignant question. This course examines how these two rich, often overlapping and interacting groups tell their stories in literature for children and young adults, with a particular focus on the mediation of traumatic pasts. What does it mean to imagine promised lands beyond such pasts—and can they be reached?  
Professor Eichler-Levine T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
 
AAS, MUS 128-10  Jazz History I CRN 43385 (HU)   3 credits 
A study of the roots of jazz. Starting in West Africa, the course traces the synthesis of African and European elements to 1945. Musicians covered are Gottshalk, Bolden, Morton, Armstrong, Hawkins, Basie, Ellington, and others.  
Professor Warfield M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m.
 
AAS, GS 196-010  The ‘refugee crisis’:  dilemmas, opportunities and possiblilities  CRN 44287 (SS) 4 credits
Recent migratory movements have seen masses of people moving from critical regions of the world to various parts of Europe. The international media often refer to this phenomenon as the ‘refugee crisis’, thus leveling out the complexities embedded in the interplay of local histories and global forces. Focusing on the recent Syrian crisis, as well as the ongoing migratory fluxes from African countries (e.g. Libya, Nigeria and Sudan) to Northern Europe (via Italy), we will investigate how identities and socio-political relations are negotiated from different perspectives and within various contexts at the intersection of political agendas, ethnicities, as well as local and global interests. The course will look at some of the dominant narratives, as well as the ‘migrant/refugee rhetoric’ employed by national and international media in the construction of the ‘refugee’ as the ‘Other’ and as a ‘problem’. We will also look at some of the causes, trajectories and dilemmas raised by the encounter between local populations and newcomers across sites of encounters and through discourse.  
Professor Ministrelli M, W; 12:45 – 2:00 p.m.
 
AAS, POLS 205-10  The Political Development of American Race Relations CRN 43527 (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits 
This course examines the distinctive role race has played in shaping the political history of the United States.  
Professor Ambar M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.
 
AAS, FREN 312-10  Modernity in the Maghreb CRN 44258 (HU) CBE Diversity, WI (Writing Intensive)  4 credits 
Emergence of the modern self through a comparative study of textual as well as visual representations of postcolonial subjects by male and female writers and film makers. Study of the way the sociopolitical context of countries such as Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia informs the constitution of subjectivity within a multicultural and multilingual community. Issues such as patriarchy, nationalism, colonialism, post colonialism, identity, gender, and Islam in North African literature and film from Franco-Arab traditions.
Professor Berrada M, W 12:35 - 1:50 p.m.
 
AAS, ENGL 318-10  Topics in African-American Literature and Culture:Superheroes, Race and Social Justice CRN 43704 (HU) CBE Diversity  4 credits
This course is a reading intensive, advanced seminar that explores the complicated intersections of superhero comics, critical race theory and social justice. Using the formal theory developed in Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics, students will be required to critically read superheroes and superhero comic books with an expressed goal of discerning important implications for social justice issues in the United States.  Course texts include, Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics, Grant Morrison’s Supergods: What Masked Vigilantes, Miraculous Mutants, and a Sun God from Smallville Can Teach Us About Being Human, and Neil Gaiman’s American Gods.  
Professor Peterson R; 4:10 - 7:00 p.m.
 
HIST 329-10  Global Africa: Aid, Volunteerism, NGO's and International Studies CRN 44194 (SS)   4 credits 
This course traces the origins of Aid to Africa, explores various volunteer activities, the role of NGOs, missionaries, philanthropists, medical practitioners, and global education in Africa. In what ways have cross-cultural interactions and exchanges between Africans and foreigners impacted African societies positively and/or negatively?  
Professor Essien T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
 
ART 356-10  Fetish Figure Frame: The Body in Global Art CRN 44010 (HU) (Writing Intensive)  4 credits 
Despite the tremendous attention given to European figurative art, the same scrutiny has not been applied to contemporary or global art movements, where figures are the subjects. This class will investigate the human body and the figure in art through the literature of art history, feminism, gender discourse, psychoanalysis, global modernism, postcolonialism and more. Students will work on an independent research project and produce a final research paper. **This class may have the opportunity to work virtually with other classes being taught simultaneously at international institutions on related topics. Details will be forthcoming in Spring/Summer 2016.** Africana Studies students should contact Art Department for pre-requisite over-ride.  
Professor Kart  T, R; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m.
 
AAS 371  Independent Study CRN varies by instructor  1-3 credits 
Independent study in advanced areas of Africana Studies. Independent research with an individual faculty member in the Africana Studies program. Consent of director Instructor permission required. 
 
AAS 372  Independent Study CRN varies by instructor   2-3 credits 
Independent study in advanced areas of Africana Studies. Independent research with an individual faculty member in the Africana Studies program. Consent of director Instructor permission required.
 
AAS, SOC 379-10  Race and Class in America CRN 43707 (SS) CBE Diversity  4 credits 
The ways in which race and class intersect in the social, economic, and political structures of American society. Through sociological literature, fiction, nonfiction, film, and other media we will explore the place of race and class in American society. We will examine how race and class operate on a personal, “micro” level, while at the same time operating on a large-scale, “macro” level.  
Professor Johnson T, R; 9:20 - 10:35 a.m.
 
AAS, WGSS, HIST 397-10  Freedom’s Workers: The Women of the Nascent Civil Rights CRN 43971 (HU)   4 credits 
This readings course will explore the role of women in the modern Civil Rights Movement/ Black Freedom Struggle.  Particular attention will be paid to how women in the movement challenged gendered norms and created collaborative pathways which inspired subsequent social justice movements.  This course will be centered on the experiences of African-American women, while giving careful attention to multiple aspects of identity including race, age, class, education, and background.  
Professor Duncan T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m.
 
AAS, COMM 398-10  Global Media and Culture CRN 43383 (Writing Intensive)  4  credits 
As an interdisciplinary field, Cultural Studies investigates dominant understandings, issues of identity and experience, and social institutions. Our class will take a Cultural Studies approach to understanding representations of difference in global media.  Class assignments and discussions will center upon the role of media in shaping the contemporary dominant understandings of various groups in a globalized world; students will be introduced to philosophies and theories that function as fundamental texts on the relationship between media, social life and human behavior and the ways in which media socially construct reality. Open only to Africana Studies and JOUR students.  
Professor El-Burki M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
 

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